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Dental Exam

Dental Exam

Teeth cure
A preventive program is a cooperative effort by the patient, dentist, and dental staff to preserve the natural dentition and supporting structures by preventing the onset, progress, and recurrence of dental diseases and conditions.

Preventing dental disease starts at home with good oral hygiene and a balanced diet. It is continued in the dental office by the efforts of your dentist and dental hygienist to promote, restore, and maintain your oral health.

Prevention also includes regular dental exams, cleanings, and x-rays. Sealants and fluoride are also great preventive treatments that help protect the teeth.

Prevention helps avoid serious and costly dental problems and is the key to having a healthy, confident, beautiful smile.

The Procedure

flossExampleA comprehensive dental exam will be performed by your dentist at your initial dental visit. At regular check-up exams, your dentist and hygienist will include the following:

Examination of diagnostic x-rays (radiographs): Essential for detection of decay, tumors, cysts, and bone loss. X-rays also help determine tooth and root positions.

Oral cancer screening: Check the face, neck, lips, tongue, throat, tissues, and gums for any signs of oral cancer.

Gum disease evaluation: Check the gums and bone around the teeth for any signs of periodontal disease.

Examination of tooth decay: All tooth surfaces will be checked for decay with special dental instruments.

Examination of existing restorations: Check current fillings, crowns, etc.

ADDITIONAL PREVENTATIVE TREATMENTS

Fluoride is the most effective agent available to help prevent tooth decay. It is a mineral that is naturally present in varying amounts in almost all foods and water supplies. The benefits of fluoride have been well known for over 50 years and are supported by many health and professional organizations.

Fluoride strengthens the teeth once they have erupted by seeping into the outer surface of the tooth enamel, making the teeth more resistant to decay. We gain topical fluoride by using fluoride containing dental products such as toothpaste, mouth rinses, and gels.

We generally recommend that children and adults have a professional application of fluoride twice a year during dental check-ups.

Remember, fluoride alone will not prevent tooth decay! It is important to brush at least twice a day, floss regularly, eat balanced meals, reduce sugary snacks, and visit your dentist on a regular basis.

A sealant is a thin, protective coating applied to the chewing surface of molars, premolars and any deep grooves (called pits and fissures) of teeth. More than 75% of dental decay begins in these deep grooves. Teeth with these conditions are hard to clean and are very susceptible to decay. A sealant protects the tooth by sealing deep grooves, creating a smooth, easy to clean surface.

Sealants can protect teeth from decay for many years, but need to be checked for wear and chipping at regular dental visits.

Reasons for sealants: Preventing Decay in…

Children and teenagers – As soon as the six-year molars (the first permanent back teeth) have fully erupted or any time throughout the cavity prone years of 6-16.

Adults – Tooth surfaces without decay that have deep grooves or depressions.

Baby teeth – Occasionally done if teeth have deep grooves or depressions and child is cavity prone or if one of the permanent teeth did not develop and the baby tooth will be retained.

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